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Road to Wellness

For Children | For Adults
If your child does not get vaccinations (shots), they are at a higher risk of catching dangerous diseases. These diseases can cause breathing problems, seizures, brain damage, and even death. Knowing what to expect as your child grows up can be helpful. Talk to your health care provider about any questions or concerns about your child’s health.
Talk with your child’s PCP or pediatrician about well-child checkups and shots. Get a vaccination (shot) card to help you keep track of which ones your child has gotten, and when they need the next one.
At this age your child may begin to smile at people, make sounds, pay attention to faces, and start pushing up while lying on their tummy.

Vaccinations at this age:
  • Hepatitis B (Hep B) (2nd dose)
  • Rotovirus (RV)
  • Diphtheria (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (HiB)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • Polio (IPV)
At this age your child smiles
at people, likes to play with
others, responds to affection,
and holds their head steady.

Vaccinations at this age:
  • Rotovirus (RV)
  • Diphtheria (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae
    type b (HiB)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • IPV Polio (IPV)
At this age your child knows familiar faces, responds to their own name, rolls over in both directions, and strings vowels together when babbling.

Vaccinations at this age:
  • Hepatitis B (Hep B)
  • Rotovirus (RV) (2nd dose)
  • Diphtheria (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (HiB)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • IPV Polio (IPV)
  • Influenza (Flu) (2 doses are given 4 weeks apart)
At this age your child cries when you leave and can wave “bye-bye.” They may be able to stand. They can look at the correct picture or thing when named.

Vaccinations at this age:
  • Hepatitis B (Hep B) (final dose given between 6-18 months)
  • Diphtheria (DTaP)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (HiB)
  • Pneumococcal (PCV)
  • IPV Polio (IPV) (3rd dose given between 6-18 months)
  • Influenza (Flu) (1st dose starts at one year and then given every year)
  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)
  • Chickenpox (VZV)
  • Hepatitis A (HEP A) (1st dose starts at one year; second dose should be given 6 months later)
At this age your child speaks clearly, tells stories, can print some letters or numbers, and enjoys playing with others.

Vaccinations at this age:
  • Diphtheria (DTaP)
  • IPV Polio (IPV)
  • Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)
  • Chickenpox (VZV)
  • Influenza (Flu)
At this age your child may not want to be told what to do, and could have access to social media. They may seek out potentially harmful activities, such as tobacco or vape products, alcohol, drugs, and sex. Depression and anxiety can be common at this age. For help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255.

Vaccinations at this age:
  • Meningococcal (2 doses needed)
  • Tenanus-Diphtheria-Pertusis (Tdap)
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) (2 doses needed)
  • Chlamydia screening (for sexually active girls and women)
Asthma is a condition that does not go away and can be very serious. The only way to control asthma is by monitoring your child’s condition and teaching them to take medications as prescribed.

Every child should have an asthma action plan filled out by their health care provider. Copies of the plan should be given to everyone who cares for your child, like babysitters, coaches, and teachers.

Call Molina’s Disease Management and Prevention program at (888) 562-5442, ext. 147121, for more information on managing your child’s asthma.

Hover on the names to get more information

At Each Visit 1 month 2 months 4 months 6 months 12 months 3 years Preteen Years Asthma Symptoms watch for important stops
Visiting your health care provider every year can help find problems early. Talk to your provider about:
  • Changes in or concerns about your health
  • Unexplained sadness, fatigue or stress
  • Preventive screenings and shots
  • Your medications
  • Diet and exercise
THE FLU SHOT CANNOT MAKE YOU SICK. Flu like symptoms after getting the shot can be caused by having contact with the flu virus before the shot was given. And since the flu can make conditions like diabetes and asthma much more difficult to manage, getting a flu shot every year between September and March can help you stay healthy.
Getting check-ups every year, especially when you are young, can help keep you healthy now and as you get older.
Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that affects both men
and women. If it’s not treated, chlamydia can make it difficult for a woman to get pregnant or cause problems during pregnancy. Women who are sexually active can get tested for chlamydia by getting a Pap or urine test.
Seeing a healthcare provider within the first 42 days, or as soon as you know you are pregnant, can help reduce problems during your pregnancy, during delivery, and even after you have given birth - for both you and your newborn baby.

Also, getting a flu shot when you are pregnant can keep you from getting sick during your pregnancy.

Getting a checkup after you have your baby will keep you healthy. You can schedule your baby’s well-child checkups and vaccinations (shots) on the same day as your postpartum checkups.
Depression is very common and can be serious. Talk with your provider if you feel:
  • Sadness
  • A lack of interest in doing much
  • More or less hungry than usual
  • Sluggish, tense or restless
  • Like harming yourself
If you take depression medication, be patient! These medications can take several weeks to work. Also, talk with your provider if you feel side effects from the medication. There may be other medications you can take. DO NOT STOP taking your medications before speaking with your provider. Stopping your medications early can make you feel worse than before you started taking them. Many people find talking with a counselor while taking medications can be very helpful. Ask your provider or call Molina Member Services at (1-800)- 869-7165, TTY 711, for a referral.
Cervical cancer can be treated if it’s found early. It is recommended that women get a Pap test with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 3 years.
While for most women a mammogram is recommended starting at age 50, your health care provider may want you to have one sooner.
  • Prediabetes means your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels are higher than normal and, if not controlled, can lead to diabetes. Losing weight if you are overweight, quitting smoking, and increasing your physical activity can lower your blood glucose levels and prevent diabetes.Talk with your provider or call our Disease Management Program at (888) 562-5442, ext. 147121, for more information on how to manage prediabetes and prevent diabetes.

  • If you have diabetes, ask your provider to do these important tests and screenings:
    • Blood pressure, feet, and weight checked at every visit
    • A1c test every 3-6 months
    • Retinal eye exam
    • Dental exam every six months
    • Foot exam by a podiatrist
    • Blood cholesterol checked and urine test every year.
High blood pressure (hypertension) can lead to heart attack and stroke. Control your blood pressure by eating foods low in sodium, keeping a healthy weight, and being active.

Talk with your provider or call our Disease Management Program at (888) 562-5442, ext. 147121, for more information on how to manage high blood pressure.
Asthma is a condition that does not go away and can be VERY serious. The only way to control asthma is to monitor your symptoms and take medications as prescribed. There are two “types” of asthma medications: Rescue and Controller.

Rescue medications help relieve asthma symptoms when an asthma attack occurs. However, Controller medications can help prevent an asthma attack! If controller medications are taken as prescribed, there should be little need to take rescue medications.

While it can be hard to take medication when you feel good, controller medications are VERY important to help prevent an asthma attack.

If you have any questions or concerns about asthma, call your health care provider or Molina’s Disease Management Program at (888) 562-5442, ext. 147121.

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